Tag Archives: red dates

korean style braised beef brisket with red dates

Taken from Muottas Muragl 2456m, Samedan, St Moritz

Snow Hiking at Muottas Muragl 2456m, Samedan-Engadin, St Moritz

Just came back from St Moritz and catching up with things and back to normal daylife. Every time when I have been away and back home, I will crave for my mom’s homemade dishes, today her braised beef brisket with red dates popped into my head. This is just one of the variations of the braised dish she prepared for us. Another traditional Chinese version (radish, carrot & pork stew) was one of my earliest posts which I used Pork instead of beef .My mom has never bought a single cookbook or written down her recipes whatsoever, she always teased me that I have to follow recipes. Although she does not have good memory on other things but she can just cook by heart. This version of braised beef brisket is actually inspired by the Korean braised beef ribs we ate from time to time in the restaurant. My dad used to insist me to help in the kitchen, I did not always enjoy it in the past but now I feel it all pays off. I could learn so much by just watching and helping her on bits and pieces in a casual way. The beauty of this braised beef brisket is that the sauce is not too dark where sometimes I prefer a clearer sauce and this taste a bit on the sweet side which most kids will love this and it tastes even better the next day.

 Korean Style Braised Beef Brisket with Red Dates

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 500g beef brisket, cut into large pieces (e.g. 3cm x 3 cm)
  • 2 small carrots
  • 1-2 white radish (I used 2 radishes because I like more vegetables)
  • 12 red dates or jujube (紅棗), deseed and cut into halves)
  • 6 slices of ginger
  • 2 shallots, keep in a whole piece)
  • 3 cloves of garlic, keep as whole)
  • 12 chestnuts (about 12 pieces, canned or fresh)
  • 2-3 pieces chinese rock sugar (or 5-6 tbsp brown sugar), according to your personal taste
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil
  • 2 tbsp mirin
  • 4 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 litre water

 

Method:

  1. Peel the white radish and carrots. Cut into chunky pieces in a zigzag way to give some irregularity to the dish and looks more natural.
  2. In a large pan, bring water to boil (water level should be able to cover the beef), put the beef brisket into the boiling water, let it boil for 3 minutes. You will see the scum floating on the water. At this time, discard the water and rinse the beef in tap water and drain the excess water. This step is important to ensure you get a clear sauce later.
  3. Heat up a large pan or a cast iron pot, add in some cooking oil, when it is hot enough, add in the ginger, scallots, garlic, stir with a wooden spatula for about 40 seconds and then add the beef brisket. Keep stirring for about a  minute or so to sear the beef.
  4. Add in the radish and carrots, quickly mix and then add in the water (the water level should NOT cover the ingredients). Bring to boil.
  5. Add the red dates, rock sugar and mirin, let it boil, stir to mix and cook for 10 minutes. Then cover the lid and reduce to medium heat. Let this cook for 90 minutes. Stir occasionally to make sure it does not stick and no burning at the bottom.
  6. Add in the chestnuts and soy sauce at this time and let it cook for another 30 mins at least or longer the better for another hour before serving.
  7. Serve with steamed rice.

 

Enjoy!

 

Notes:

  • In Korean restaurants, they like using beef ribs, I choose to use beef brisket as the ones in Switzerland are less fatty and the fat is all trimmed which make it convenient to prepare.
  • One very important point highlighted by my mom is that the light soy sauce has to be added in the end, reason for this is to get a relatively clear and not so dark sauce.
  • Red date is an important traditional medicine for both Chinese and Korean. It is believed red dates can alleviate stress and improve blood circulation.
  • Rock Sugar is a famous product from Guangdong Province (South of China). It is processed from pure sugar cane using tradition method to give its clear and bright yellow color. It is used for dishes which you would like to have clearer liquid in contrast to chinese brown sugar.
Rock Sugar

Rock Sugar

korean style braised beef brisket (galbi jjim)

Taken from Muottas Muragl 2456m, Samedan, St Moritz

Snow Hiking at Muottas Muragl 2456m, Samedan-Engadin, St Moritz

Just came back from St Moritz and catching up with things and back to normal daylife. Every time when I have been away and back home, I will crave for my mom’s homemade dishes, today her braised beef brisket with red dates popped into my head. This is just one of the variations of the braised dish she prepared for us. Another traditional Chinese version (radish, carrot & pork stew) was one of my earliest posts which I used Pork instead of beef. My mom has never bought a single cookbook or written down her recipes whatsoever, she always teased me that I have to follow recipes. Although she does not have good memory on other things but she can just cook by heart. This version of braised beef brisket is actually inspired by the Korean braised beef ribs we ate from time to time in the restaurant. My dad used to insist me to help in the kitchen, I did not always enjoy it in the past but now I feel it all pays off. I could learn so much by just watching and helping her on bits and pieces in a casual way. The beauty of this braised beef brisket is that the sauce is not too dark where sometimes I prefer a clearer sauce and this taste a bit on the sweet side which most kids will love this and it tastes even better the next day.

 Korean Style Braised Beef Brisket with Red Dates

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • 500g beef brisket, cut into large pieces (e.g. 3cm x 3 cm)
  • 2 small carrots
  • 1-2 white radish (I used 2 radishes because I like more vegetables)
  • 12 red dates or jujube (紅棗), deseed and cut into halves)
  • 6 slices of ginger
  • 2 shallots, keep in a whole piece)
  • 3 cloves of garlic, keep as whole)
  • 12 chestnuts (about 12 pieces, canned or fresh)
  • 2-3 pieces chinese rock sugar (or 5-6 tbsp brown sugar), according to your personal taste
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil
  • 2 tbsp mirin
  • 4 tbsp light soy sauce
  • 1 litre water

 

Method:

  1. Peel the white radish and carrots. Cut into chunky pieces in a zigzag way to give some irregularity to the dish and looks more natural.
  2. In a large pan, bring water to boil (water level should be able to cover the beef), put the beef brisket into the boiling water, let it boil for 3 minutes. You will see the scum floating on the water. At this time, discard the water and rinse the beef in tap water and drain the excess water. This step is important to ensure you get a clear sauce later.
  3. Heat up a large pan or a cast iron pot, add in some cooking oil, when it is hot enough, add in the ginger, scallots, garlic, stir with a wooden spatula for about 40 seconds and then add the beef brisket. Keep stirring for about a  minute or so to sear the beef.
  4. Add in the radish and carrots, quickly mix and then add in the water (the water level should NOT cover the ingredients). Bring to boil.
  5. Add the red dates, rock sugar and mirin, let it boil, stir to mix and cook for 10 minutes. Then cover the lid and reduce to medium heat. Let this cook for 90 minutes. Stir occasionally to make sure it does not stick and no burning at the bottom.
  6. Add in the chestnuts and soy sauce at this time and let it cook for another 30 mins at least or longer the better for another hour before serving.
  7. Serve with steamed rice.

 

Enjoy!

 

Notes:

  • In Korean restaurants, they like using beef ribs, I choose to use beef brisket as the ones in Switzerland are less fatty and the fat is all trimmed which make it convenient to prepare.
  • One very important point highlighted by my mom is that the light soy sauce has to be added in the end, reason for this is to get a relatively clear and not so dark sauce.
  • Red date is an important traditional medicine for both Chinese and Korean. It is believed red dates can alleviate stress and improve blood circulation.
  • Rock Sugar is a famous product from Guangdong Province (South of China). It is processed from pure sugar cane using tradition method to give its clear and bright yellow color. It is used for dishes which you would like to have clearer liquid in contrast to chinese brown sugar.
Rock Sugar

Rock Sugar

chinese chicken congee with a little twist (雞粥)

Fig. 1 Chinese Chicken Congee with a little twist served in a ceramic pot bought in Kyoto, Japan

 

In Hong Kong, my mom and dad make the best congees (rice porridges), we have it very often at home and always served with stirred fried noodles.

Chicken congee is my all time favorite. This is a very nice comfort food especially after having too much alcohol or if you are not feeling too well. A lot people always said the chickens in Western countries are not tasty enough but today I could proof this is wrong. I bought this French Free Range Chicken, it has yellow skin like the chicken we have in Hong Kong, the white skin ones I admit that they are not so tasty. This time, shortly after boiling for roughly 30 mins, I could tell this congee would be much better than the ones I made before. The chicken flavor was coming out so quickly that I could just tell by the smell it came out. Just finished a big bowl and it triggered me to blog it immediately.

Fig. 2 Commonly used Dried Ingredients in Chinese Cooking: Dried Mushrooms, Dried Scallops and Dried red dates (Jujube); as seen in #8072 foodgawker, 28.10.08

This time I was inspired to infuse some Korean cuisine elements into this congee by adding a few red dates (jujube) and garlic which they are used in preparing the Ginseng Chicken Soup (Sam Gae Tang in Korean). Chinese also use red dates a lot in soup but not in congee. I was curious of how it would taste and the result came out just nice and the ingredients blended very well to each other without anything being overpowered.

 

Serves 4

Ingredients:

  • Half fresh chicken (normal size), best used yellow-skinned chicken
  • 1 small cup long grain rice
  • 6-8 dried red dates stoned (Fig. 2)
  • 2 dried scallops (Fig. 2)
  • 6 dried chinese mushrooms (Fig. 2)
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 small piece of peeled ginger, about 2cm x 2cm
  • approx. 1500 ml water
  • Japanese tea filter sachets x2 (optional) (Please click to see image in my other post)

Method:

  1. In separate small bowls, hydrate the red dates, dried scallops and dried mushrooms by soaking in hot water for about an hour.
  2. Using a sharp knife, remove the skin and trim off the fatty tissue from the chicken except for the chicken wing.
  3. Wash the rice and put into a large pan
  4. When the dried ingredients are hydrated, discard the water.
  5. Place the dried scallops into a teabag. The reason why I did this is because I find dried scallops will break into small pieces while cooking, they usually sink to the bottom of the pan, and may stick to the bottom making the congee get burned more easily. I find the Japanese teabags are very useful and served more than one purpose for making tea. You can use any filter cotton bag of course.  
  6. Cut the hydrated mushrooms into slices.
  7. Also place the 2 cloves garlic in another teabag, as I want to keep them in whole piece when cooked.
  8. Place the chicken into the pan, followed by all other ingredients. Pour in the cold water and bring it to boil in high heat for 10 mins (Fig. 3).
  9. Skim off any scum (the foam and fat) that rises to the surface of the liquid using a big flat spoon*. This step is important to ensure you get nice clear broth for the congee.
  10. Then turn into medium heat and let it cook for about 1 hour and 30 mins. Stir from time to time to avoid sticking at the bottom.
  11. When the congee is cooked**, take the chicken out and remove the bones, then put the chicken pieces back into the pan. You can decide how big pieces of the meat you like. Take out the garlic and dried scallops, put aside and allocate to the bowls when serving.
  12. Season the congee with some salt and serve immediately when hot.

Fig. 3 Chicken Congee with ingredients added, this is how it looked after cooking for the first 30 mins

 

 

Notes:

*An alternative method to step 7 is to briefly cook the meat in a separate pan of boiling water, in Chinese terms it’s literally translated as “fly with water” 飛水. Let it boil for 5-10 mins, you will find the scum coming out, discard the liquid and tranfer the chicken back to the cooking pan. This method is particularly useful when you use meat that has been kept in the freezer. Somehow frozen meat tends to produce more scum I find. As I described above, this step or skimming is important to give you a nice clear liquid in whatever dishes you cook. 

**Do NOT overcook. You have to turn off the heat when the congee is cooked, it will get burned easily if overcooked. Of course you can reheat, what I mean is not to keep it boiling for excessive time once it’s cooked.

I personally like having food served very hot so I have used my favorite ceramic pot which I bought in Kyoto, Japan (Fig. 1). I like this pot very much as it can be used on both electric stove or gas stove, it’s worth carrying all the way back. I transferred a portion to the pot, brought it to boil and served.

Hope you enjoy this norishing congee!